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Poster: staggerleib Date: Feb 6, 2009 11:05am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Positively 4th Street

So today I was listening to the Ladder to the Stars disc and heard the unbelievable rendition that Jerry did of this Dylan classic. (Don't you hate it when we techy people begin sentences with "So"?)

I was touched by the pacing of the song, and the unbelievable subtlety that Jerry used in the lead at roughly 2:30.

He could say so much with so few notes, I have to say that I don't know another guitar player, who can do what he did. There are some unbelievable players out there. Many who I'd consider to be expert, and Jerry certainly lives up to that. He could jam with the best of 'em. But his artistry lay in the pure knowledge of theory and the instrument, as well as such a beautiful laid-back approach.

I'm struck by something Gris said in Grateful Dawg. Now Gris is an amazing technician as well as artist. Timing is so critical to bluegrass, after all. But he said that he'd be in constant fear that Jerry wouldn't make it "In Time." He always did, but there was a sort of sliding into it that Jerry did that made the combination so sweet.

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Poster: high flow Date: Feb 6, 2009 11:23am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

...and Jerry was respected by giants like Miles for his unique phrasing, both lyrical and instrumental.

IMO, Jerry performed Dylan better than Dylan. As far as writing goes.....Dylan is, and forever will remain, king.

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Feb 6, 2009 11:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

I believe that Dylan exists as the single greatest song writer ever, and testimony to that is that so many, and such a varied array of artists not only cover him, but cover him so well.

Somewhere I have a bootleg of World Party, where Karl Wallinger cover's Dylan, probably one of my favorites.. But think about it. How many versions of Watchtower are there out there?

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Poster: Styrofoam Cueball Date: Feb 8, 2009 12:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively Shakedown Street

...and this just might be the weirdest:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFdyd8oIVYU

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Feb 8, 2009 12:38pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

High Flow--

very curious you're mentioning Miles respecting Jerry...I was listening to that excellent CD Jer recorded with Grisman w/Miles covers including "So What" and "Milestones"...really one of the great underrated CD's ever IMO...and my wife asked me if Miles ever talked about Garcia or The Dead and what he thought of them...I didn't have an answer b/c I've never seen any printed comments or heard Miles mention Jerry in interviews...I only assumed he would have been at least a casual fan since Miles started doing his jazz/rock/acid/fusion thing in the late 60's (Bitches Brew) and would have to have been at least aware of the Dead's emergence in that time period.

Do you have any links of Miles' comments re: Jerry and/or The Dead? Would be very interested to hear what he said, especially since he was so famously hard to please and did not suffer fools gladly.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 8, 2009 1:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Here's Miles from his autobiography (one of the few pages where he doesn't say motherfucker every other word, dis Cicely Tyson, or comment on Coltrane getting blowjobs):

http://books.google.com/books?id=xgAVXHhuNYgC&;pg=PA302&lpg=PA302&dq=Miles+the+Autobiography+Jerry+Garcia&source=web&ots=BS4vYEmrbZ&sig=esl1v8RbNLBeCqgVmqT_0PpDwmk&hl=en&ei=p0mPSfvSK4r2sAPfh8COCQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=2&ct=result

If that link doesn't work (too lazy to fix), just google "Miles the Autobiography" and "Jerry Garcia"

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Feb 8, 2009 2:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Thanks BD.....found the pasage and informed the wife...of course, she says "Did they talk about the different ways they shot up together?"

Can't win for tryin'.... ;-)

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Feb 14, 2009 6:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Miles / GD

hey Grendel, couldn't see but a snippet of that page, so not sure if Miles referenced his shared billing w/GD on a short run of shows involving the Bitches Brew line up (?)

This post was modified by midnight sun on 2009-02-14 14:31:13

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Poster: grendelschoice Date: Feb 9, 2009 2:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Miles / GD

wasn't much else...mostly just Miles talking about talking with Jerry...made me go back and listen to "Kind of Blue", the Grsiman/Garcia "So What" disc, and the Dead's brief snippet of "So What" at Hampton in March of 1988 (a show I was lucky enough to attend).

Very gratifying to know a guy as serious as Miles thought well of the Boys (or at least Jerry).

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 9, 2009 11:34am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Miles / GD

"meat and potatoes"

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Poster: midnight sun Date: Feb 9, 2009 12:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Miles / GD

"bitches" and "warlocks"

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 14, 2009 4:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Miles / GD

Hey guy--been a while...assume you are good and cold, but hope all is well.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: Feb 6, 2009 11:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

I think the Dead covered Dylan better than anybody but I still think Bob's versions are always the definitive. Positively 4th Street is one of my favs and Jerry dos it great but when talking about the ultimate put down song ( which is what I believe Jerry called it ), who can put someone in their place better than Dylan?

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Feb 6, 2009 2:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Dylan himself said in a Rolling Stone interview that when he wanted to revisit one of his older songs or arrangements he would "play the Grateful Dead version" rather than his own. Dylan has given the band credit on numerous occasions for giving him new inspiration to play. He told an amusing story in his autobiography "Chronicles" about a rehearsal with the band in 1987 on Front Street that had a big impact on him, even putting forth the possibility that he had been dosed.

"I went to San Rafael to meet with the Dead. I thought it would be as easy as jumping rope..... They wanted to run over all the songs, the ones they liked, the seldom seen ones. I found myself in a peculiar position and I could hear the brakes screech...I had no feelings for any of those songs and didn't know how I could sing them with any intent...There were so many I couldn't tell which was which- I might even get the words to some mixed up with others. I needed sets of lyrics to understand what they were talking about....I felt like a goon and didn't want to stick around.... After saying that I'd left something at the hotel I stepped back outside onto Front Street and started walking... I wasn't planning on going back."

Dylan then relates how he ducked into a club on Front Street after hearing a jazz combo playing inside fronted by an old jazz singer.

"Suddenly and without warning, it was like the guy had an open window to my soul. It was like he was saying "You should do it this way." All of a sudden, I understood something faster than I ever did before. I could feel how he worked at getting his power, what he was doing to get at it. I knew where the power was coming from and it wasn't his voice, though the voice brought me sharply back to myself. I used to do this thing, I'm thinking. It was a long time ago and it had been automatic...
Returning to The Dead's rehearsal hall as if nothing had happened, I picked up where we had left off, couldn't wait to get started-taking one of the songs they wanted to do, seeing if I could sing it using the same method that the old singer used. I had a premonition something would happen. At first it was hard going... In the beginning all I could get out was a blood-choked coughing grunt and it blasted up from the bottom of my lower self, but it bypassed my brain. That had never happened before. It burned, but I was awake... This was revelatory.... Maybe they just dropped something in my drink, I can't say, but anything they wanted to do was fine with me. I had that old jazz singer to thank"

Excerpts from 'Chronicles. Volume One' by Bob Dylan



This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-02-06 22:07:02

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 6, 2009 2:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

WOW - very cool. I've been meaning to pick up that book when I stumble across it used but may just have to do the old amazon thing now. Thanks. And let me post this for the umpteenth time:
“There’s no way to measure his greatness or magnitude as a person or a player. I don’t think any eulogizing will do him justice. He was that great, much more than a superb musician, with an uncanny ear and dexterity. He’s the very spirit personified of whatever is Muddy River country at its core and screams up into the spheres. He really had no equal. To me, he wasn’t only a musician and friend, he was more like a big brother who taught and showed me more than he’ll ever know. There’s a lot of spaces and advances between The Carter Family, Buddy Holly and say Ornette Coleman, a lot of universes, but he filled them all without being a member of any school. His playing was moody, awesome, sophisticated, hypnotic and subtle. There’s no way to convey the loss. It just digs down really deep”
1995 Dylan press release on the passing of Jerry Garcia

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Feb 6, 2009 2:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Thanks BD. That quote always gives me chicken skin. If Jerry had a tombstone then that quote should have been engraved on it.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 6, 2009 2:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

check out this picture of the jesus and john the baptist (not sure who is who):

http://visionsofdylan.blogspot.com/2007/08/jerry-garcia-week-part-2.html

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Feb 6, 2009 2:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

I really miss him.

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Feb 6, 2009 3:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

"The Dead did a lot of my songs, and we'd just take the whole arrangement, because they did it better than me. Jerry Garcia could hear the song in all my bad recordings, the song that was buried there. So if I want to bring out something different, I just bring out one of them Dead records and see which one I wanna do. I never do that with my records."
2006 interview with Jonathan Lethem

Thanks for pointing that page out. That was from the RS interview I alluded to.

Here's another Dylan quote from the liner notes to "World Gone Wrong". This is Dylan's "explanation" of the song "Two Soldiers", a song Dylan would perform after learning it from Jerry, who recorded it with David Grisman.

"Jerry Garcia showed me "Two Soldiers" (Hazel & Alice do it pretty similar) A battle song extraordinaire, some dragoon officer's epaulettes laying liquid in the mud, physical plunge into Limitationville, war dominated by finance (lending money for interest being a nauseating & revolting thing) love is not collateral. hittin' em where they ain't (in the imperfect state that they're in) America when Mother was the queen of Her heart, before Charlie Chaplin, before the Wild One, before the Children of the Sun- before the celestial grunge, before the insane world of entertainment exploded in our faces- before the ancient & honorable artillery had been taken out of the city, learning to go forward by turning back the clock, stopping the mind from thinking in hours, firing a few random shots at the face of time."

Dylan also does another song on that album that Jerry used to play, Jack-O Roe.

"the song cannot be categorized-is worlds away from reality but "gets inside" reality anyway & strips it of its steel and concrete. inverted symmetry, legally stateless, travelling under a false passport. "before you step on board, sir..." are you any good at what you do? submerge your personality."

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-02-06 23:00:15

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Poster: fireeagle Date: Feb 6, 2009 3:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

san rafael sbd http://www.archive.org/iathreads/post-view.php?id=123420

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Feb 6, 2009 8:20pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Also check the San Rafael sessions here:
http://exploringthenet.blogspot.com/

The complete rehearsals are much better IMO than the live material they did on the '87 tour. There are some real pearls to be found there, especially songs like "Stealin'", "John Hardy" (with Jerry on banjo), "Oh Boy!" "Blues Stay Away From Me" and "Boy In The Bubble", songs they never performed live together.

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-02-07 04:20:27

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Feb 7, 2009 2:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Dawg!

I've been digging through the Blogosphere lately, but hadn't seen this particular blog. There are some completely awesome blogs for bootlegs. But, these sessions are such a find, and I am so glad you pointed me here.

Thanks so much.

SL

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Poster: staggerleib Date: Feb 9, 2009 12:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

SD-
I've been listening to the whole sessions, and I have to agree that the intensity and spontaneity of the D&D sessions far outweighs what lives in the official release as fairly canned.

A real find.

Have you listed to the Infidels sessions off of the same blog? If not, you need to seriously dig it.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 9, 2009 12:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

I've never listend to that Infidels' stuff, but if that means Knopfler w/ Sly and Robbie (Riddim' Twins) then I'm headed over....

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Poster: SkyDawg Date: Feb 9, 2009 1:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Positively 4th Street

Thanks, I will take your suggestion. I feel that Infidels was the only decent album Dylan put out in the 80's. I have heard outtakes of "Jokerman" and some of the other songs from Infidels on the Bob Dylan collections called "The Genuine Bootleg Series", but have never heard these sessions.

BTW, I just DL's a torrent called Dylan & The Dead, The Unreleased Live Album that purports to be the album the Dead INTENDED to release as opposed to the one that WAS released and the takes are indeed superior. I read an interview with Jerry once when he described Dylan using what Jerry described as an "eighty-dollar Ghetto-Blaster" to choose cuts to be released on the official album to Jerry's horror and dismay. You should also check out this "unofficial" version sometime.

As far as the Dylan-Dead sessions, I just LOVE a whole bunch of those rehearsals, especially ones like "Walkin' Down The Line" where Jerry, Dylan and the guys seem to be having a ball singing together. Jerry just NAILS Walkin' Down The Line"! Should have done that one and "Stealin'" live for sure. I also dig the way the band gets off singing the backing verse to All I Really Want To Do, and the take on the old outlaw ballad "John Hardy". Jerry plays a lot of banjo and pedal steel on these sessions. Thats always a welcome treat! Brent sounds like the country keyboardist Floyd Cramer on these sessions. His playing is SPECTACULAR! "Dead Man, Dead Man" also smokes! I wish these sessions could be released officially someday.

This post was modified by SkyDawg on 2009-02-09 21:54:12

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